Saturday, December 17th

Longing:  An Advent Devotional Overland Park Church of the Nazarene Advent 2016 Saturday, December 17th   CONNECT As we continue our journey in Advent, let us sing, pray, and study our hopes and promises for our Savior:   Opening Prayer God of all things, you are with us. We ask that you help us to see your work in and around us today. Help us to be messengers of your hope and love as we allow your Word to live in us. In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, Amen.     Hymn “Art Thou He That Should Come, Dear Lord” By: William O. Cushing (1823-1903)   1 Art Thou He that should come, dear Lord? Then why are we bound in prison? Why is our night so sad and long? Why is our Light not risen? Wait, brother, for the day is breaking, Dreary night shall roll away; All the shadows round thee gathering Soon shall melt in a glorious day.      2 Art Thou He that should come, dear Lord? Then why are the sad hearts crying? Why are the poor still trampled down? Why are the needy dying?  Wait, sister, for the day is breaking, Dreary night shall roll away; All the shadows round thee gathering Soon shall melt in a glorious day.  3 Art Thou He that was promised, Lord? O hear Thou the captives weeping; See how the tide of sin and woe  Wide o’er the world is sweeping.  Wait, brother, for the day is breaking, Dreary night shall roll away; All the shadows round thee gathering Soon shall melt in a glorious day.    GROW:  Matthew 11:2-11     By this time in Matthew’s narrative, John the Baptist had spent years calling people to repentance in preparation for the Messiah. Even though he dedicated his life to that message, forsaking even regular clothes and food, in prison he seemed to want some reassurance that Jesus was really the Messiah. Maybe he was weary and needed to know that the new Kingdom was close. Maybe he wanted to encourage his disciples.     Christ’s answer is simply the evidence of the Kingdom: the sick and disabled being healed, the dead raised, and good news being preached. Jesus also answers by pointing to John as the prophet who goes before, implying that Jesus is the one being prepared for. These would both seem to indicate that Jesus is the Messiah, but it says a little more too. His description calls to mind the Old Testament prophets, and in doing so makes a bold statement about who he is. In Isaiah (29:19, 35:1-6, 61:1), the prophet tells of the work of God in saving his people: the sick and disabled being healed, the dead raised, and good news being preached. Even when talking about John, he refers to Malachi 3:1, which talks about a messenger preparing the way for the Lord. Jesus is letting the disciples know that he IS the one to come and bring a new Kingdom, but also that he is God dwelling with his people.     When we are going through our difficult times in life, whether it is prison like John or illness, discouragement, financial hardship, or loneliness, it is easy to want some reassurance. Maybe you’ve even had moments where you wonder if your faith matters. In those moments, Jesus gives us the good news that he is bringing about the Kingdom, even when we can’t see it through our literal or metaphorical prison. When we feel stuck waiting for the promises yet to come, Jesus brings us hope because Jesus has come among us. He was with John’s disciples then and is with us now, comforting us and making us new. SERVE Jesus is Emmanuel, God with us, and he calls us to be like him. One way that we can do that is to come alongside others and offer comfort and hope. Take a moment in prayer and ask God to bring to mind someone in your life who is going through a tough season and might need a little encouragement. Take a few minutes and write them a note of love and hope. Drop it in the mail today or go deliver it in person. As you mail it or deliver it, pray for that person, that God would help them in their need, but also that he would help them to sense the peace that Christ is with us. —Pastor Rachel Shald

Longing:  An Advent Devotional

Overland Park Church of the Nazarene

Advent 2016

Saturday, December 17th

 

CONNECT

As we continue our journey in Advent, let us sing, pray, and study our hopes and promises for our Savior:

 

Opening Prayer

God of all things, you are with us. We ask that you help us to see your work in and around us today. Help us to be messengers of your hope and love as we allow your Word to live in us. In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, Amen.

 

 

Hymn

“Art Thou He That Should Come, Dear Lord”

By: William O. Cushing (1823-1903)

 

1 Art Thou He that should come, dear Lord?

Then why are we bound in prison?

Why is our night so sad and long?

Why is our Light not risen?

Wait, brother, for the day is breaking,

Dreary night shall roll away;

All the shadows round thee gathering

Soon shall melt in a glorious day. 

 

 

2 Art Thou He that should come, dear Lord?

Then why are the sad hearts crying?

Why are the poor still trampled down?

Why are the needy dying? 

Wait, sister, for the day is breaking,

Dreary night shall roll away;

All the shadows round thee gathering

Soon shall melt in a glorious day. 

3 Art Thou He that was promised, Lord?

O hear Thou the captives weeping;

See how the tide of sin and woe 

Wide o’er the world is sweeping. 

Wait, brother, for the day is breaking,

Dreary night shall roll away;

All the shadows round thee gathering

Soon shall melt in a glorious day. 

 

GROW:  Matthew 11:2-11

    By this time in Matthew’s narrative, John the Baptist had spent years calling people to repentance in preparation for the Messiah. Even though he dedicated his life to that message, forsaking even regular clothes and food, in prison he seemed to want some reassurance that Jesus was really the Messiah. Maybe he was weary and needed to know that the new Kingdom was close. Maybe he wanted to encourage his disciples.

    Christ’s answer is simply the evidence of the Kingdom: the sick and disabled being healed, the dead raised, and good news being preached. Jesus also answers by pointing to John as the prophet who goes before, implying that Jesus is the one being prepared for. These would both seem to indicate that Jesus is the Messiah, but it says a little more too. His description calls to mind the Old Testament prophets, and in doing so makes a bold statement about who he is. In Isaiah (29:19, 35:1-6, 61:1), the prophet tells of the work of God in saving his people: the sick and disabled being healed, the dead raised, and good news being preached. Even when talking about John, he refers to Malachi 3:1, which talks about a messenger preparing the way for the Lord. Jesus is letting the disciples know that he IS the one to come and bring a new Kingdom, but also that he is God dwelling with his people.

    When we are going through our difficult times in life, whether it is prison like John or illness, discouragement, financial hardship, or loneliness, it is easy to want some reassurance. Maybe you’ve even had moments where you wonder if your faith matters. In those moments, Jesus gives us the good news that he is bringing about the Kingdom, even when we can’t see it through our literal or metaphorical prison. When we feel stuck waiting for the promises yet to come, Jesus brings us hope because Jesus has come among us. He was with John’s disciples then and is with us now, comforting us and making us new.

SERVE

Jesus is Emmanuel, God with us, and he calls us to be like him. One way that we can do that is to come alongside others and offer comfort and hope. Take a moment in prayer and ask God to bring to mind someone in your life who is going through a tough season and might need a little encouragement. Take a few minutes and write them a note of love and hope. Drop it in the mail today or go deliver it in person. As you mail it or deliver it, pray for that person, that God would help them in their need, but also that he would help them to sense the peace that Christ is with us.

Pastor Rachel Shald